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Friday, February 3, 2012

THE DAY THE MUSIC DIED

THIS IS ONE OF THOSE POSTINGS YOU JUST NEED TO CLICK ON THE LINKS!!!


After a gig in Clearlake, Iowa (memorial, left), Charles Hardin "Buddy" Holley got tired of a run-down bus of the 24-day, 24-town Winter Dance Party tour, so hired a charter plane to take him and his crew to Fargo, North Dakota (the closest airport to Moorehead, Minnesota, the next show).  Waylon Jennings, the bass player, gave his place to 17-year old Ritchie Valens (below, left--you might have seen "La Bamba") because he was suffering from a cold, while Tommy Allsup, the guitarist, flipped a coin and lost for the remaining seat with J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson (below right, Chantilly Lace).  Holley jokingly remarked to Jennings, "I hope your ol' bus freezes up!"  To which Jennings retorted, facetiously, "Well, I hope your ol' plane crashes!"  He went on to become a country superstar, and to his deathbed a decade ago was haunted by his statement.


It was, indeed, a dark and stormy (and snowy) night when the Beech Bonanza, piloted by 21-year old Roger Peterson, who had already flown 17 hours that day, took off soon after midnight on February 3, 1959.  I remember the day as a freshman at Stanford.  Eddie Cochran the day after the crash recorded Three Stars.  In 1971, Don McLean paid a tribute to the three in American Pie, from which came, "the day the music died."

Eerily, Buddy Holley recorded "That'll Be the Day," about his death in 1958.  The title came from John Wayne in The Searchers.  The Beatles, then known as the Quarrymen, used this song as their original demonstration record.  Holley had a huge influence over the Rolling Stones, Bobby Dilon and Eric Clapton.

The Dow Jones Industrials Shot up 157 to 12,862, while except for Japan, all major world markets also increased.  Gold sunk $31/toz to $1726, with the WTI Cushing now up to $98/barrel, and Dated Brent Spot at $114/barrel, a $16/barrel difference.

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